Vitamin E

Formal Names:

Tocopherols, tocotrienols

Supplement forms:

Food, pills, liquid

Recommended daily allowance (in mg):

Baby

Infants

4-5

Child

Children

6-11

Adolscent

Adolscents

15

Adult

Adults

15

Pregnant

Pregnant Women

15

Lactate

Lactating Women

19

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What is...?

Vitamin E is actually a family of fat-soluble compounds whose most important role is acting as a potent antioxidant, scavenging free radicals that are the result of oxidation in the body. It also regulates the body's enzymes, and assists in the transformation of information between cells.

Bodily functions

The main role of vitamin E in the body is to protect it against oxidative damage. This antioxidant activity plays a large part in the reputation the vitamin has in helping guard against cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer's disease (only from the form of the vitamin that comes from food), macular degeneration, diabetes, and a host of other ailments. In addition to preventing oxidative stress, it helps to protect skin from ultraviolet radiation (UV rays).

Deficiency Symptoms

Vitamin E deficiency symptoms include the following: Muscle weakness, abnormal eye movements, vision problems, unsteady gait, loss of muscle mass, pain, tingling, loss of sensation, blindness, nerve damage, and/or impaired reasoning.

Foods

Wheat germ, liver, eggs, almonds, hazelnuts, walnuts, sunflower seeds, cold-pressed vegetable oils, dark green leafy vegetables, avocados, asparagus, and sweet potatoes.asparagus, sweet potatoes

Side effects

Vitamin E has demonstrated no toxic effects when coming from food sources. However, it is possible that very high doses of 3000 IU or more can cause symptoms of toxicity, which may include diarrhea, intestinal cramps, muscle weakness, fatigue and double vision. Vitamin E may prevent clotting and prolong bleeding in those who take the vitamin who have a simultaneous deficiency of vitamin K.

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